Snowy road in Helsinki with cyclists

End road deaths: learning from Helsinki

By Jamie Clarke

More than 100 people from across Oxfordshire gathered on the evening of Tuesday 25 January to kick start a campaign to put an end to cyclist deaths on our roads. This follows the tragic deaths of four young women cycling in Oxford over the past 2 years. Cyclox organised the event to initiate an ambitious plan to eliminate road deaths.

Local traffic neighbourhood with planter and bollard closing off residential street to cars

Show your support for the Central Oxfordshire Travel Plan

By Alison Hill

On 29 November the Oxfordshire County Council Cabinet is meeting to make decisions on two radical traffic proposals: the Central Oxfordshire Travel Plan and, as a core component of that plan, the traffic filters that aim to reduce the number of car journeys across the city. These plans have caused a lot of contention and the council chamber will no doubt be full to bursting with people wanting to put their views across. The plan, if implemented, will result in a huge shakeup in the way all of us will travel into, within and around Oxford.

20 mph sign painted n road

Save lives in Oxford with 20 mph

By Alison Hill

20 mph saves lives. The likelihood of severe or fatal injury to a pedestrian struck by a driver is 17% at 20 mph, 30% at 25 mph and 47% at 30 mph. There are 7–10 times fewer fatalities if a collision occurs at 20 mph compared to 30 mph. Inevitably, people make errors of judgement on roads, but those errors are less serious at slower speeds.

New local Travel Plan heralds radical change

Our statement on the Oxfordshire Central Oxfordshire Travel Plan

The Plan envisions Oxford as a city where transport is no longer dominated by the use of private cars, but a city where people can choose to travel conveniently by public transport and feel safe to cycle and walk. This will create a better, more liveable city, while simultaneously addressing the climate emergency and improving the health of Oxford’s residents and visitors. 

Cyclists riding along lane segregated from cars by posts

Cycling along Oxford’s Quickways

By Alison Hill

On Friday 12 August Morrell Avenue became a Quickway. Overnight, double yellow lines were painted on both sides of the road, removing on-road car parking, and a cycle lane has been painted on the uphill side of the road. Whereas in the past you had to weave your way round parked cars and take care to avoid colliding with vehicles sharing the narrow carriageway, it has instantly become much more pleasant to ride up and down this road.